Study Area

In addition to the three exhibition levels, other spaces are available to our visitors where they can expand their knowledge. The Study Area on the first exhibition level is one of these.

The Study Area is a space equipped with variable showcases that make it possible to stage small, specialist exhibitons, thus making an additional contribution to the discourse on current issues related to Jewish cultural history. Items from our continuously growing collection can also be displayed here in detail on an intimate scale.

Study Area

In addition to the three exhibition levels, other spaces are available to our visitors where they can expand their knowledge. The Study Area on the first exhibition level is one of these.

The Study Area is a space equipped with variable showcases that make it possible to stage small, specialist exhibitons, thus making an additional contribution to the discourse on current issues related to Jewish cultural history. Items from our continuously growing collection can also be displayed here in detail on an intimate scale.

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Find out more about our current events and regular guided tours

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Are you a teacher and would like to visit our museum with your class(es) or colleagues? Find out more about our individual packages for teachers and school classes.

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Niv Fridman, Heidi in Israel, 2021  Niv Fridman
Niv Fridman, Heidi in Israel, 2021 © Niv Fridman

May 11 – October 16, 2022 | Study Area Level 1

HEIDI IN ISRAEL

Photo series by Niv Fridman

An Exhibition in the Study Area at the Jewish Museum Munich

The Israeli artist Niv Fridman has re-staged “Heidi” in a Near Eastern setting. Fridman approached this subject by taking a close look at historical postcards from the early 20th century which show the “Holy Land” in a romantic light as a place of longing. He associated these postcards with Heidi and her attachment to her native country. Similar to the landscapes on the postcards, Heidi’s world in the mountains is also a romantic place of longing of great symbolic power. In this way Fridman consciously places “his Heidi”—potrayed by the Israeli dancer and performance artist Tamar Rosenzweig—in locations and landscapes which for him symbolise the Israeli countryside and, in so doing, creates his own Near Eastern “Heidi Land.”
A sculpture, made of real Swiss chocolate complements the photo series as a tribute to Heidi’s native country. Based on a photograph, it shows the dancer Tamar Rosenzweig as Heidi, looking self-confidently and full of hope at the sun, her arm held protectively against the bright light.

Niv Fridman (born 1996) lives and works in Tel Aviv. He studied at the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Jerusalem and at Cooper Union College in New York. Fridman has been awarded numerous prizes for his work. He often combines historical and contemporary elements in his artistic works and also frequently mirrors themes in classical childrens’ literature.

An exhibition of the Heidiseum to accompany the exhibition “Heidi in Israel. Searching for Traces” in cooperation with the Jewish Museum Munich.